Archive for the ‘Archeology’ Category

Archaeologists Blast Hasty World Heritage Listings

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

One of the most significant global committees that you never heard of summoned a couple of hundred experts to the island of Menorca, Spain last week. The meeting involved politics, the remnants of great civilizations, human catastrophes, architectural triumphs, religious works of art and architecture, use of tourism, the rise and fall of empires, and did we say politics?

Who Owns the Past?

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

The federal government should fix or drop new regulations that throttle scientific study of America’s heritage Thousands of remains could be made inaccessible to researchers. In our view, the new regulations should be repealed or, at least, revised to distinguish different classes of unidentified remains.

Ancient manuscript found in Brisbane

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

The Queensland Museum has been revealed as an unlikely resting place for the missing pieces of a rare manuscript from ancient Egypt.
Archaeologists had been searching for the missing fragments of the rare Book of the Dead for 100 years when a visiting Egyptologist stumbled across them while in Brisbane to open a mummy exhibition.

RARE DNA VARIANT MAY DISPROVE PALEOLITHIC MIGRATION TO AMERICA ACROSS THE ATLANTIC

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

A new analysis of the rare mitochondrial DNA haplogroup C4c in Native American populations shows that it has a parallel genetic history with the X2a haplogroup thought by some to indicate a connection between early Paleoindians in eastern North America and the Upper Paleolithic Solutrean culture in France and Spain.

Lovers’ Pipe Dreams Emerge from Jerusalem Excavation

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

An archaeological excavation in the Jewish Quarter of Jerusalem has uncovered a centuries-old clay pipe inscribed with the phrase “Love is the language for lovers.”

Mysterious Mass Sacrifice Found Near Ancient Peru Pyramid

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

An apparent ritual mass sacrifice—including decapitations and a royal beer bash—is coming to light near a pre-Inca pyramid in northern Peru, archaeologists say.

Bronze-Age Burial Chamber Uncovered in Aleppo

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The excavations department at the Aleppo Archeology and Museums Directorate uncovered an ancient burial chamber dating back to early Bronze Age at the village of Sousan, 12 kilometers west of Ein al-Arab town in Aleppo governorate.

MYSTERIOUS ‘SPACE BALL’ CRASHES IN NAMIBIA

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Around mid-November, authorities in Namibia were alerted to the discovery of a hollow sphere that had apparently crashed to Earth from space.

ANCIENT TEXTS PART OF EARLIEST KNOWN DOCUMENTS

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

A team of scholars has discovered what might be the oldest representation of the Tower of Babel of Biblical fame, they report in a newly published book.

Action taken to restore Egypt Scientific Institute

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

A meeting to draw a comprehensive restoration plan for Egypt Scientific Institute is to be held Tuesday at the Ministry of State for Antiquities

Irikaitz archaeological site: only for the tenacious

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The recent discovery of a pendant at the Irikaitz archaeological site in Zestoa (in the Basque province of Gipuzkoa) has given rise to intense debate: it may be as old as 25,000 years, which would make it the oldest found to date at open-air excavations throughout the whole of the Iberian Peninsula

Protecting Apollo artifacts on the Moon

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Within the next few years, one of the 26 teams competing in the Google Lunar X PRIZE (GLXP) competition will hopefully claim the $20-million grand prize by successfully landing its privately funded spacecraft on the Moon, traveling at least 500 meters across the lunar surface, and transmitting video and images back to Earth

Castles in the desert – satellites reveal lost cities of Libya

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

An international team of researchers has used ancient DNA to shed new light on the realism of horses depicted in prehistoric cave paintings. The team, which includes researchers from the University of York, has found that all the color variations seen in Paleolithic cave paintings — including distinctive “leopard” spotting — existed in pre-domestic horse populations, lending weight to the argument that the artists were reflecting their natural environment.

MoDOT archaeologists find ancient Native American sites at bridge near Palmyra

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

What started as a routine survey of the land surrounding a historic bridge has ended up unearthing two significant sites in the region’s Native American history.

Drought is revealing historic treasures

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

All across Texas, the bones of history lie in watery graves. From the ribs of sunken ships to the grave sites of prehistoric Texans, uncounted treasures abound beneath the surface of rivers and lakes. For state archaeologists, these sites are untapped treasures — hard to reach but relatively protected.

Underneath Mexico City’s bustle lie Aztec wonders

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

In the middle of Mexico City’s historical downtown, where the modern bustle leaves most visitors in a daze, archaeologists have unearthed something altogether more serene: a potential clue in their quest to find the long sought-after tombs of Aztec emperors.

Scientists Uncover Clues to How the Classic Maya Sustained Their Dense Populations

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

The Maya lowlands during the ancient Maya Classic period (250 – 900 A.D.) were known to have been among the densest populated areas in the world. And archaeologists have estimated that, even in places such as the southern Maya Mountains area of Belize where geographic and other environmental conditions could be assumed to have mitigated population growth, population density has been estimated to have been approximately 300 persons per square kilometer at one time.

UA scientists find evidence of Roman period megadrought

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

A new study at the University of Arizona’s Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has revealed a previously unknown multi-decade drought period in the second century A.D.

Byzantine-era Christian prayer box discovered in City of David parking lot

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Walk through the Christian quarter of Jerusalem’s Old City and you’ll see souvenir shops selling assorted varieties of small plastic Christian prayer boxes displaying miniature icons, usually Mary and Jesus, surrounded by a gold halo.

lackbeard’s Cannon Lifted from Ocean Floor

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

Archaeologists lifted a 300-year-old cannon from the pirate Blackbeard’s ship off the coast of North Carolina today.
The eight-foot-long cannon was covered in sand and ocean debris called “concretion,” which will take archaeologists and students at East Carolina University as many as eight years to crack through before getting to the metal cannon, according to Jennifer Woodward, secretary of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, which oversees the project.