Archive for the ‘Solar System’ Category

Cape Cod Storm Damage Seen From Space

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013
Cape Cod Sand Dune Breach

Cape Cod Sand Dune Breach

NASA’s Earth Observatory has an interesting view of a sand dune breach and swirling sediment off the coast.  Be sure to check out the slider to compare the before and after images.    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=80523

Saturn moon spouts plasma unlike any seen before

Friday, June 8th, 2012

A NEW form of matter surrounds Saturn – a plasma put there by Enceladus, the planet’s tiny moon.
“It’s a type of charged particle that has never been observed before,” says Tom Hill of Rice University in Houston, Texas.

Craters serve as a Martian chronicle

Friday, June 8th, 2012

In honor of science-fiction legend Ray Bradbury’s passing, here’s a totally non-fictional Martian chronicle: a picture of two craters on the Red Planet that record how the climate has changed over the course of billions of years.

Some newfound planets are something else

Friday, June 8th, 2012

When the Kepler spacecraft finds a giant planet closely orbiting a star, there’s a one in three chance that it’s not really a planet at all.

Asteroid Warning System Would Alert and Educate Public Worldwide

Friday, June 8th, 2012

The nations of the world need to work together to develop a warning and communication system that could mitigate the worst effects of a catastrophic asteroid strike, a new report stresses.

VENUS TRANSIT PHOTO FROM THE SPACE STATION

Friday, June 8th, 2012

The biggest problem with photographing any astronomical object from the ground is that you have to look through the Earth’s atmosphere. Turbulence in the atmospheric gases can cause wobble and blurriness in your observations — it is this turbulence that causes stars to twinkle, after all.

Huge Lake on Saturn’s Moon Titan Acts Like Earth’s Mudflats

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

An enormous lake on Saturn’s moon Titan apparently behaves like mudflats on our planet, draining and refilling over time, according to a new study.

Russia to Send Manned Mission to Moon by 2030

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Russia is planning to send a manned mission to the moon by 2030, Russian space agency Roscosmos said on its website on Friday.

HOW LONG HAS TITAN BEEN A HAZY METHANE MOON?

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Saturn’s moon Titan is one of the most scientifically interesting spots in the solar system. The second-largest moon after Jupiter’s Gannymede and bigger than the planet Mercury, it’s shrouded beneath a thick, smoggy atmosphere rich in methane creating a greenhouse effect and constantly unloads complex hydrocarbons that rain down on the surface.

Astronomer finds meteorite pieces in Gold Country

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Searchers near historic Sutter’s Mill have discovered fragments of the meteorite that exploded high in the sky at sunrise last Sunday.

“Coronal Cells” in Sun’s Atmosphere

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

Astronomers discover an unexpected new feature on the Sun, leading to further insights about the Sun’s magnetic field.

Giant asteroids struck Earth more often than thought

Saturday, April 28th, 2012

The meteor that exploded over California last weekend rained rubble down on the site where gold was discovered in 1848 and where scores of modern-day treasure seekers and clue-seeking researchers are expected to descend this weekend in search of fragments.

Dazzling satellite views of vast Moon crater

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), overseen by ASU professor Mark Robinson, has been busy taking high resolution photos of the Moon’s surface. Most recently, LROC captured stunning photos of the Moon’s enormous Aristarchus crater. Wired Science reporter and freelance journalist Adam Mann posted a story on Wired’s website today about this crater, which is two times as deep as the Grand Canyon.

Pseudo-moons Orbit Earth

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Earth may be going steady with the Moon, but it has a bit of a wanderer’s relationship with some other nearby objects. A study by an international trio of scientists suggests that, at any given time, there is at least one meter-sized mini asteroid temporarily orbiting our planet.

WHERE WOULD EARTH-LIKE PLANETS FIND WATER?

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Throughout 2011 there was a string of breathless news stories about astronomers finding extrasolar planets in the habitable zones surrounding their stars.
This is the “Goldilocks Zone” where temperatures are just right for water to remain in liquid form and presumably nurture life as we know it.

The Austere Beauty of Other Worlds

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

In the northern winter months we are surrounded by the stark beauty of chilled landscapes. From the darkness of the far north, broken perhaps only by starlight and the glow of aurora, to the brisk grey streets of Manhattan and its now skeletal trees with their claw-like limbs and knobbly stubs pressed to the skies, this is not a time of complexity or color.

NASA’s Twin Grail Spacecraft Reunite in Lunar Orbit

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

The second of NASA’s two Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft has successfully completed its planned main engine burn and is now in lunar orbit. Working together, GRAIL-A and GRAIL-B will study the moon as never before.

Martian Life Might Thrive in Lava Tubes, Study Suggests

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Ice within lava tubes on Earth can host bacteria in cold, Mars-like conditions, hinting that life could dwell in similar lava tubes on Mars, researchers say.

Are we alone in the universe?

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Huge excitement last week. Two Earth-size planetsfound orbiting a sun-like star less than a thousand light-years away. This comes two weeks after the stunning announcement of another planet orbiting another star at precisely the right distance — within the “habitable zone” that is not too hot and not too cold — to allow for liquid water and therefore possible life.

NASA’s Cassini Delivers Holiday Treats from Saturn

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

No team of reindeer, but radio signals flying clear across the solar system from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have delivered a holiday package of glorious images. The pictures, from Cassini’s imaging team, show Saturn’s largest, most colorful ornament, Titan, and other icy baubles in orbit around this splendid planet.